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they are from self-defense forces looking to russia for protection, but not members of the russian military. those are the outlines of the developments so far today. let's just listen to a little of what sergei lavrov had to say in mid drid. >> translator: i would to understand what you understand by pro russian forces. these are the forces of self-defense created by the residents of crimea. we did not order them. they didn't get any orders from us. as to the military personnel of the black sea fleet, they are in places of their dislocation, yes. some additional measures of extra vigilance were taken to provide the security of the troops of the police fleet. as our president said we will do everything not to let any bloodshed, not to any attempt at life and security of those who live in the ukraine including, of course, the citizens of the russian federation. >> reporter: sergei lavrov speaking in madrid. let's go to tom barge who sdwroins us now from madrid. was anything discussed about this outline plan about international monitors, tom? >> reporter: it's interesting, a small protest grou
alerted u.s. officials several days before the crisis began. >> thank you. joining me live, former defense secretary don rumsfeld is with us. mr. secretary, thank you for joining us. do you think john mccain is right that in fact the president doesn't understand putin's ambition? >> well, sean, most of the discussion that's taking place is what's putin doing today, what should we do today. all this chatter about the world and the united nations. the cold hard facts are, it was syria, iran. it could be more activity in the prs and the south china sea. what's really happening is, the central problem is american weakness. we're managing our economy like juveniles and telling the world that in the next decade or two, we're not going to be there. we're cutting back our defense fund funds. when eisenhower and kennedy were in office, we spent 10% gdp on foreign defense. we're sending a signal that america's weak, we're in decline and weakness is bro voktive. we've created a leadership vacuum in the world he's being filled like putin, it will be filled like other putin like people. you think of ma
. secretary of defense chuck hagel has counterparts, america's top of a tree officer also is speaking with his top counterpart, russia's top military officer. foreign ministers from united states and russi rushed me with several european leaders in hopes of solv solvent ongoing dispute. state department is calling a brief discussion after the main group meetings. they will meet again in about an hour. urgent talks between russia and ukraine. jon: new witness testimony today linking paralympic track star oscar pistorius to a new shooting. he is accusing the shooting death of his model girlfriend on valentine's day last year. joining us by phone, fox news producer. paula. >> we have learned oscar pistorius said it is not so much about "blade runner" as "played shifter." they said they were inquiring a loaded gun in the restaurant. he then asked the gun owner to say to people if anybody asks that it was him who had fired the gun. the witness claims pistorius claimed he did not want the media on his back. here's what some of what this guy had to say. >> i don't how the gun went off. he did apologi
defensive and also still a shrine where thousands it of people come each day to pay their respects to those who died here. we'll have complete coverage confident crisis in ukraine from here in kiev. also on the ground from correspondents in crimea at the top of the hour. erin be? >> looking forward to seeing you in a few minutes. >>> emotion dominating day two of the murder trial involving oscar pistorius. at times the testimony proved too much for the one-time athlete and a star witness. robyn curnow is out front in the south africa. >> it was awful. >> a key witness breaking down on the second day of oscar pistorius' murder trial. the olympic runner's neighbor testified she heard blood curdling screams the night reeva was killed followed by four gunshots. the defense tried to poke holes in the neighbor's story. >> the question was not that difficult. shall i repeat it again? please listen carefully. just listen to the question please. >> the defense went on to question the neighbor's credibility. >> you heard that out of a closed toilet and a half, 177 meters away? >> then in graphic deta
the missile defense systems in europe? >> that was a mistake. when the president pulled back the missile defense in polapd and chech republic it sent the wrong message to russia. we should revisit that decision because the russians have not acted differently. they are not acting like they should act. they have violated international law and other countries integrity. we need to protect ourselves and europe and look at reinstating those missile defense systems. that is a huge mistake by the president. >> senator, thank you for being with us. >> we are following the rapid changing developments the president obama spoke with president putin and secretary of state john kerry spoke with his russian counterpart and we are expecting to hear his comments and the tensions are high, is a peaceful solution possible? >> and allegations of a obama care bail out. will taxpayers be on the hook for that? >> a victim of a hit and run. the police have it on tape and the search for the person behind the whole is on. geico motorcycle. see how much you could save. >>> a young girl is recovering today after a
they said that this is not app invasion, it's a protective defensive measure, and on land and at sea in the harbour, what they have down is surround places. that is not to say that they want to go in and have a fight. it's to stop what they would see as fascist elements from kiev or troops here controlled by fascist elements from kiev attacking the pro-russian majority civilian population. whether you believe it, because we have seen no sign of fascist elements here at all, and no sign of the ukrainian soldiers wanting to engage in a fight as evidence of the situation at the sevastopol airport. certainly the russians want to be seen here as nonaggressive. given that they have been approached by a group of ukrainians without arms, there's no way in the world they would have wanted to be seen to be firing on unarmed ukrainian soldiers. that would be disastrous for them. >> laurence lee reporting there from crimea. >> the united states and the european union are both considering sanctions against russia. what are they likely to comprise, and how much bite will they have. one of the russ
, they are backed up by civilian defense forces, and i think that's a real danger, because those people are unpredicted. the forces we have seen have been very disciplined. they have only a few strategically placed bullets in their weapons, and have been very calm, but the civilian forces tend to get very agitated, and they are alongside these military forces, so you have russians right at the door, and then civilian forces right in front of them, and when i tried to get into a base a couple of days ago, it wasn't the russians who stopped me, it was the ukrainians of russian decent. and there is a big divide between those two sides. >> jennifer we hear music in the background. what is the mood right now? >> reporter: well, you know, if you go around town, you can see i'm in sort of an touristry, entertainment area, and people by and large are trying to go out, and business and usual, but this is a navy town. one woman i spoke to yesterday, said her neighbor told her they are going to have to leave because her husband refuses to sign an oath to crimea. so there are deep divides among nei
: you are reading the same headlines we are out of the russian defense ministry and from russian sources, first saying they would potentially be some assault on ukrainian forces who were holding out, albeit peacefully at the moment on the crimean peninsula. then we understand no such ultimatum has been issued. really, events down in the crimea which is in the southern part of this huge european country, let's not forget it's the second largest country by land mass in europe, with a 2300 kilometer border with russia. events are very fluid and really, no clear picture coming out. at the moment, we do know this government here in ukraine which is pro-western, is very defiant even though they are saying they are still looking for very diplomatic messages. that's despite the foreign minister of russia today being pretty aggressive, telling western powers not to back this government in ukraine. i spoke to the prime minister yatsenyuk today. i asked what's his message to lavrov and the russians. >> my message is that we will find a political and diplomatic solution despite the fact that russian
was really interesting, after those charges were read out, the defense attorney erupting oscar pistorius laid out, if you will, some of the points of the defense. oscar pistorius signed an affidavit at his bail hearing said that he had heard a disturbance in the bathroom of his house just after he had been to retrieve some fans from the balcony of that apartment of that house, and that's when he grabbed the pistol from underneath his bed, went into the bathroom, shot those shots through the bathroom door. even the magistrate at the time at the bail hearing had said, how could oscar pistorius not have known that his girlfriend, reeva steenkamp, wasn't in the bed? well, listening to his defense attorney now, we're beginning to get some semblance of details added on. his defense attorney said as oscar, or just before oscar pistorius went to get those fans from his balcony, he had talked to reeva steenkamp in bed. the indication there laying the groundwork that he believed she was in bed because he had just talked to her. he said it was pitch dark and that's why he didn't know. so, we're beginnin
been seeing so far. we haven't seen attacks or violence, but according to the defense ministry spokesman who is in crimea, this is what is going on and what is expected tonight. some very strong words. >> i want to follow up on that. it would be indeed quite an escalation. power cut off to the plant, you are saying warning shots fired, she's a these are the first shots fired since russian troops have been on the ground. the ukrainian budget is 1/18 of their budget. what are they doing to respond to that? >> they are say that go all funds are going toward preparing the military. this is a country that is deep in debt. they are hurting. they need a $35 billion lifeline. their budget is far, smaller than the russians. their military equipment is not as advanced as the russians and they do not have the fire power a cross the board. there is no question the russians would win that and the ukraineians would lose. there are interesting things to point out. you do have that tatar population there. it is very much anti-russian and pro the government here in the ukraine and they are sayi
governments are talking on a cabinet level today for the first time. and then there's a russian defense official discussing ukraine with nato members in brussels as well. of course, there's only one man who can make or break any deal. that's vladimir putin. it's just unclear what he will do next. talking about sending international observers. will putin allow them to go into crimea? we just don't know. now that putin controls crimea, that may be the new status quo, to remind everyone that ukraine's future depends on him. betty, back to you. >> a lot of variables here. jim, thank you. >>> back at home, there is a new political fight to tell you about. president obama's $3.9 trillion budget is now on capitol hill. the highlight is a massive expansion of the earned income tax credit. the 13.5 million more workers would be eligible for $60 billion in credits. also included is billions for roads and rails. it's spending, the white house says, will bolster the economy. but republicans say the president's budget is dead on arrival, complaining that it runs up the long-term national debt. >>> a
the world's second-largest economy with steady growth and a 12% increase in spending. -- in defense spending. also coming up for you this hour on "france 24," just 100 days to go until the football world cup in brazil. but things there are far behind schedule. we will take a closer look to see just if it will all be ready on time. and karl lagerfeld gives his latest show a very commercial twist just returning paris' cash crunch into l.a. into a giant chanel market. latest on the ukraine -- the head of the european union executive arm says that the ee was ready to provide ukraine with $11 million -- 11 billion euros in aid, made up of loans and grants in the coming years. it comes as there has been a flurry of diplomatic maneuvering on ukraine throughout europe today. the russian foreign minister was in spain first this morning for talks. speaking in madrid, he repeated russia's assertion that armed men deployed in the eastern ukrainian region of crimea are not russian forces. >> we believe that the problem in ukraine comes from the international community's lack of reaction. it failed to fin
on the table. that's what secretary of defense, chuck hagel, delivered today. we are going to send an aircraft wing that's been in poland, a nato ally to the west of ukraine, that's going to be extended. the u.s. is going to send more aircraft to the baltic state, north of the ukraine, also nato allies. more aircraft there. he is going to convenient nato ministers to talk about the next step. you have the carrot and the stick. if this doesn't change, the situation on the ground doesn't change, costs are going to be imposed. at the same time, we are going to demonstrate our commitment to those nato allies. you see them there, the ones in green along ukraine's western poured der. . >> jim sciutto live and michael holmes, we do have some breaking news right now from capitol hill. as jim was saying, what is being most used right now, words and statements. diplomacy in this crisis. there are about to be some words and statements coming from the u.s. congress. >> our deirdra walsh just spoke with ed royce, chairman of the foreign committee in the house. he said tomorrow that committee will hold a vo
had to enhance the defense of the military facilities because they are constantly receiving threats and we were aware of the armed nationalist moving in. russia was well-trained, well-equipped 16,000 or more troops. and vladimer putin was worried about enhancing the defense of the military facilities because they were constantly receiving threats. there is something i would like to stress he says, it isn't within my authority and we don't intend to interfere, but we believe all citizens of ukraine should be given the same equal right to participate in the life of their country and determining their future. we are seeing justification for intervention and serious intervention in eastern ukraine. he takes a shot at the united states saying our partners in the united states formulate their own political interest and using the principle you are with us or against us, they draw the whole world in, and those that cannot join in get beaten until they do. he says our approach is different. we always act legitimately. i am not making this up. this is what vladimer putin said: i have been an
the russian troops adopted what they would see entirely as defensive positions and having their photographs taken with pro-russian local and smoking cigarettes in many places and have not had clips loaded on their guns and they have been, i think, at pains to point out they don't want to be seen as an aggressive force equally. by the same token the body language and symbolism from the ukraine troops this morning was equally passive and one was a soviet flag from the second world war saying they fought against fascism but are no longer but carried a ukraine flag and the implication of that is they want to be see potentially being on the russian side but won't surrender and will not swear allegiance to the flag and there is not resistance going on but a sense of defiance as well. >> reporter: lawrence, thanks for keeping us up to date with the events in crimea and we will keep a close eye on things there. russia appears to be moving more military assets to the region and russian war ships passed through in istambul and saying they may go to ukraine and they are in ukraine by a lesser sense o
controlled senate. he was controversial because of his involvement in the defense of a convicted cop killer, everyone voting against the nomination. here is the clempbler. they voted along with these seven democrats. either the first time it's gone down since they changed filibuster rule. anchor of special report. this is a stinking rebuke of the obama administration. >> the fact that senator harry reid, senate majority leader would put up this vote, and they had vice president joe biden up there ready to cast the tie vote for democrats to get him through if it was a a tie. remember, this vote goes down even after democrats changed the rules in the senate. remember the nuclear option. it was changed from 60 votes to get cloche you're to a simple majority, 50 plus one, 51. after vote know, senator reid added his vote to bring it back up. eight democrats voted no. the nomination went down. century you have democrats who voted know, republicans pointing to another eight who voted yes for this nomination they are probably going to take it in the midterms as an issue, a political issue, especial
.9 trillion request includes $495 billion for the defense department. >> good afternoon, everyone. thank you for being here. as you know today we have the presentation of the president's budget. for today's briefing, as part of that introduction and presentation, i have with me the director of the office of management and budget, sylvia burwell. i have jason furman, the chairman of the president's council of economic advisors. cecilia munoz, the director of the domestic policy council, and gene sperling, the director of the economic council. each of my guests will have an opening statement and then we'll take questions related to budget matters. i'll try to direct traffic in that question and answer session. i will have comments on ukraine, but if you could hold questions on those subjects not related to the budget until after we're done with q&a on the budget that will be terrific. and with that i turn it over to sylvia. >> thanks, jay. the president's 2015 budget, which we released earlier today, is basically a fiscal road map for accelerating economic growth, expanding opportunity and ens
the threat or use of force. and that none of their weapons will ever be used against ukraine except in self-defense or otherwise in accordance with the charter of the united nations. that clearly hasn't happened now, even though putin claims he's potential acting to protect the russian populace. >> no, it hasn't, but then again, you know, seen from not just russia, but many ukrainance as well, what happened was not like what happened in egypt with the overthrow of commune im. yanukovych was a repulsive ruler in many ways, but he wasn't elected. a large part of the ukrainian parliament is being chased out of kiev, you know, the representatives of the east and south, the parties which supported yanukovych. so it is highly questionable whether this government in kiev does have any degree of democratic legitimately. that's why, quite rightly, the west has gotten a promise of new elections in may, but of course the question is how one can hold free and fair elections with nationalist militia in control of with you pant of the country and russian soldiers in control of another. >> finally, the west is cl
that russians, the ukrainian defense ministry now being denied from russia. what's the story from where you are tim? >> reporter: well i think everyone has an agenda obviously with this crisis in crimea. and of course, to a certain extent it is in the ukrainians' interest to keep reports of russian aggression or alleged aggression or forthcoming aggression high on the agenda. now, it pa may well frof to be e in the -- prove to be true in the coming hours that russia is going to carry out some kind of ultimatum or fulfill some kind of deadline for ukrainian troops have have been -- who have been surrounded in crimea by pro-russian forces, in their barracks, on their ships, may make good this reported threat which was coming from sources certified the defense ministry here, may make good that, and actually fulfill their plan. but, as you say, it's been denied at the moment by russia. now, at the moment, we can just watch and wait. and report what both sides are saying. so it is a very tense situation. and obviously, russia, as well, wants to keep the needle going, if that's the right way to
budget with defense cuts amid mounting national security challenges. >> i must say your timing is exquisite. >> now, beyond crimea, mccain mentioned stalled iranian negotiations, conflict in syria, and the chinese getting more aggressive in the south china sea just as china announces it's increasing its own military spending sharply. >> ed henry live on the north lawn, thank you. >>> yeah crane's new prime minister said crimea must remain part of his country. john kerry is trying to cajole the russians to play nice, but he appears to have little leverage. james rosen is traveling with secretary kerry in paris tonight. >> joined by aides inside the ambassador's residence in paris, john kerry squared off once more against russia's long time foreign minister, sergey lavrov, one of the least charitable diplomats who had already telegraphed how little the kremlin will concede by the an exation of crimea in southeastern ukraine, home to the warm water fleet. >> some special alert measures have been adopted to control the fleet because as our president said we're not going to allow an
abandoned our missile defense agreements with them to protect europe from a rogue missile coming out of the mideast. russia backed obama down. if i were president obama, i would re-engage poland and the czech republic regarding missile defense. i would admit georgia to nato. i'd have a larger military presence in the balkans to nato members who are threatened by russia. i would fly the nato flag as strongly as i could around putin. i would suspend his membership in the g-8. become the g-7. the g-20 would become the g-19 at least for a year. every day he stays in the ukraine i would add to it. >> senator durbin, first to the question of why would putin care about this condemnation? he is much more interested in crimea than he is about what the united states thinks about him. >> candy, vladimir putin and the russians just spent $50 billion on this sochi charm offensive to try to redefine russia in the 21st century. that sochi charm offensive died on the streets of sevastopol. when he moved in thousands of troops days after the closing ceremony. he is trying to have it both ways. he wan
governments for the very first time talking at least on a cabinet level today and a russian defense official discussing ukraine with nato members in brussels. and tamron, amongst this swirl of activity, you've got russia and the west's end games, which are beginning to emerge. on the one hand, washington and berlin are pushing a plan agreed to by western foreign ministers today in paris that would include international observers, direct talks between moscow and kiev and new elections in may. the russians, on the other hand, want to see a return of viktor yanukovych, they call him the legitimate president, he would have new elections, not in may, but december. there's a big gulf between the two sides, but at least, tamron, they are talking again. back to you. >> absolutely, thank you very much, jim maceda. now let me bring in new york congressman elliiot engel, he's also a member of the congressional ukrainian caucus. sir, thank you so much for your time. >> thank you. >> i know defense secretary chuck hagel was at a house hearing this morning giving an update and he said he and general demps
heard it again today from the russian defense minister. he maintained that no, there are no russian soldiers occupying crimea as it stands. they maintain this position that they say it is local self-defense teams, local militias, and we only know on the ground what we see and what our own cfn teams have seen. there's some local militias but undoubtedly russian soldiers. not wearing the insignia but heavily armed, driving armored vehicles, some of those vehicles have russian registration plates. very difficult to see how negotiations can proceed when the russian position is just that they have not begun any occupation of ukrainian territory. >> phil black in moscow. as we mentioned at the top of the hour, russia is due to take part in nato's discussion of the cries in ukraine. john kerry is due to meet with his russian counterpart. kerry lamented russian's absence ever his counterparts from great britain and ukraine. >> we have our friends from ukraine and great britain, partners in the budapest agreement of 1994. we're missing one member, hopefully meet this afternoon with that indi
. they are willing to switch sides. ukraine cost millions -- ministry of defense has denied those reports. they might follow the example of the navy commander. >> you are at the scene of the standoff. what can you tell us about what you saw? situation can be described as a war of nerves. it is between russian soldiers and the ukrainian forces. the russians have brought dozens of military vehicles. there at the ukrainian army base. they are there to stay. on the other side, isaiah ukrainian soldiers and many of them were very young and ill-equipped. they were not very experienced. they were standing behind gates and looking at the russian troops. my impression is that ukrainian soldiers were scared. they were frightened. >> thank you for joining us. thank you for that report. pressure is mounting from the west. john kerry called the russian military an incredible act of aggression. he warned moscow that they could lose their membership in the group of eight nations. they may have economics options -- sanctions. there was a crisis meeting in brussels. -- heto chief warned that urged russia to stop its
- china ramps up defense spending as the united states cuts back. >>> three of al jazeera's journalists detained in an egyptian prison make their second court appearance in a few hours. >>> and still looking over venezuela a near after his death - hugo chavez remains part of every day life. [ ♪ music ] >>> hello. world powers usually preoccupied with syria are rapidly flying diplomats around the globe to get to grips with ukraine. the united states and europe have been slated against russia. john kerry and sergei lavrov are due to meet in paris. they are meant to talk about syria, but no doubt ukraine will fig fighture. ukrainian soldiers, meanwhile, have been, in some says forced to choose sides. jennifer glasse reports from sevastopol. >> if there's somewhere where the russians have full control, it's here at sevastopol. ships of the black sea fleet halt all traffic, draining all life from this otherwise thriving port. if the russian's intentions is to take over ukrainian military instillations, it is not over yet. ukrainian servicemen refuse to yield to the russian show of force.
they are relenting. the troop buildup continues. the ukrainian coastal defense division is still pinned in. on the east coast of crimea, another military base is now encircled. and now border guards report seeing a massive buildup of military hardware on the russian side of the border. crimea is lost. kiev knows it. but how far did president putin's ambitions stretched. with one mighty turn to eastern ukraine. and is there anything to stop him? christian frazier, bbc news, sevastopol. >> big questions certainly. now to kiev. david stern is there for us. david, the prime minister of ukraine and the british foreign secretary have been speaking. what is their take at the moment? >> reporter: well, yes. as the crisis continues in crimea, the tension and worry and anger, among the ukrainian officials, is rising here. as you say. mr. william hague and the prime minister have been meeting. they have held a news conference. mr. hague said there will be consequences and costs to the russian actions. he promised a strong diplomatic and economic reaction, a response. but he said there was no military
did test fire a long-range intercontinental ballistic missile. defense officials tell fox news they were expecting that launch. we will get much more from our pentagon correspondent, jennifer give in, in a few minutes. more signs of tension in the crimea. a russian soldier firld his gun in the air to hold back angry ukrainian troops. that situation ended with no violence at all. in fact, most of the russian occupation had been peaceful. ikely because the majority of the people in the crimea identifies russia and 80% people speak russian as their first language. but outside of the cripple yeah a -- crimea and kiev, people have given their blood and sometimes lives to cut ties with the ruler. we saw fighting play out here. the square is filled with memories of the protesters that died. we saw flowers along with pictures of the dead. the burned-out square is still littered in all areas with signs of that chaos that happened here. the sunset is about to nasa half our in independence square in kiev. there are flowers by the millions. the tires we all saw burning last week, as the pr
with russia. discard what has failed, with this feckless policy. i would renew the missile defense program in the czech wouldic and in poland i have some nato exercises with the baltic states. bill thatexpand a targets individuals who are responsible for this. there are other things we can do. the initial signals out of encouraging as far as sanctions are concerned. >> i do know that. do think sanctions that were effective in iran would have the same kind of effect on vladimir putin? try thenk i would target individuals and the bank accounts and the ability to travel. i would try that first. then i would look at others. g-8.im out of the s.number of other cosmetic whate have to understand this guy is all about. kgb --n old i said, watching russia and watch ukraine. unfortunately, i was correct. >> there enough. -- fair enough. do you have enough leverage to make him feel the repercussions of what you have done so severely that he will change his policy? >> i do not think in the short term that there is anything right now that is draconian enough to make him change. of our policyn towards r
ukrainians like lab rats and insisting russian troops in crimea wearing unmarked uniforms are local defense forces. what happens now is anyone's guess. >> man, what's going on? ♪ >> the first shots fired today, luckily just warning shots as an extraordinary moment unfolded in crimea this morning when troops led by their colonel decided to march to the airfield they used to man until the russians arrived last week. there, unarmed, singing the ukraine national anthem, they confronted the russian soldiers. >> the standoff lasted five hours. russian snipers at the ready. finally, the ukrainians backed down. >> the standoff lasted five hours. russian snipers at the ready. finally, the ukrainians backed down. >> reporter: the order is given. return to barracks. great dignity and showing great military discipline, they decided enough is enough and march off back to their base. >> the standoff was an incredible scene in itself, but it also revealed how quickly geopolitical stakes are escalated in this crisis. listen to this moment, again, as ukrainian troops marched toward the russians. "america
says troops in crimea are not under direct moscow control. >> if these are the forces of self-defense that were created by the residents of crimea. we did not order them. they didn't get any orders from us. >> reporter: i'm tim willcox live in kiev on independence square. at the heart of this crisis in ukraine. >>> also in the program, a third of all women in europe have been physically or sexually abused. the most e tensive survey of its kind also reveals one in 20 women say they've been raped. >>> the smog that's choking china, the country's prime minister blames it on inefficient and blind development. >>> also in the program, aaron is here looking at more of those challenges facing beijing. >> it's all about steering the world's second largest economy in the right direction. leaders are talking a leaner, cleaner growth tackling everything from smoke to corruption. beijing is also throwing more money at its military making the chinese defense budget now the second biggest in the world. >>> good to have you with us here on gmt. midday in london, 7:00 a.m. in london, 1:00 p.m. in par
troops back. foreign minister sergey lavrov say the pro-russian griewpts are quote self-defense forces and they do not answer to moscow. he made the remarks in madrid. he says russian naval personnel are in their normal deployment. we have seen those ships off of the coast. kerry laughed when he heard this at the news conference that they are claiming they have no control over these russian troops that are really pressing back against the ukrainian troops. gregg: some of their armored vehicles have russian insignias identifying them as russian even though they are dressed in dark outfits with no other indication. back to our top story. we are waiting to see if former irs official lois lerner will testify in a house oversight hearing on the targeting of organizations by the irs. back in may of last year she famously invoked her fifth amendment rights not to talk. let many get to our chief congressional correspondent mike emanuel. any independent casings what she is going to do? i suppose there are several options. >> reporter: darrell issa and the attorney for lois lerner have been talk
shaking in their boots. after all the russian told the president to take our missile defense systems out of europe, and president said yes, sir, and took them out, put them on the back of our navy, and gave the navy no additional asset to do that. now he is cutting asset that navy has, i don't think that the president right now has the credibility necessary to back up many of his statements. lou: and do you have a view as to what likely putin will do in ukraine? >> lou, one thing that we're always afraid of, when you see the vacuums then you know, president putin may try t to -- exhibit some of his muscle, a react on world react, not u.s. reacted we're hoping he will be deliberate and not do, that let the ukrainian people work this out forever themselves, no matter how difficult that work out might be. lou: i was to turn to the issue of defense spending, and budget cuts, that are being insisted upon our military, and the pentagon. you are a champion of our military. you are more concerned than most on capitol hill. about national security, day in and day out. what is your judgment of the
for the latest nice. we'll hear from secretary of state john kerry and secretary of defense chuck hagel. we'll have analysis on all of it from our panel of experts and with russia once more in the news we'll look back at a milestone "face the nation" interview. 60 years of news because this is "face the nation." captioning sponsored by cbs >> schieffer: good morning again there are developments from overnight on the crisis in ukraine. russian president sad her putin has moved troops in to crimea that is region where mostly russian speaking population, a move that the ukrainian prime minister says is a declaration of war. vladimir putin and president obama spoke yesterday for 90 minutes a conversation the white house described as the toughest of the obama presidency. as for ukraine, a new government there is mobilizing its reserves and authorizing the call up of all men under the age of 40. cbs news correspondent is in kiev, charlie, people are again out in the square, what's going on there? >> well, there are about a thousand demonstrators and protesters arrived here,, today we've been hea
in crimea. we have now spoken to someone from the ministry of defense. they say let's not put too much weight on this. frankly, every time that the russian troops have encircled military bases and they have now around ten, they have given some kind of an ultimatum. he said this is just another one of those. frankly, these ultimatums have passed and nothing has really happened. so i think it is important not to put too much weight on this deadli deadline. it is not necessarily an official deadline. from what we have seen, they have been very calm. it has been a very low key kind of invasion. ben wedeman our own ben wedeman was just at one of the border post bases. he said that the soldiers there, one commander told him he got his orders to leave his base at the black sea fleet on saturday. he had come up there. the locals were giving him tea and letting him have a place to have showers. so it has all been very amicable. as i said, a pretty low-key invasion. the situation on the ground here is very, very calm. it seems to be the international community and the world markets and everyone
. -- we want to reiterate our concerns to abide by the provisions of the 1994 defense memorandum. we guarantee the sovereignty and integrity of ukraine. we note that the provision calls for the one. -- call for the signatories to consult when there are questions concerning the commitments within the document. this clause is even more relevant now, and indeed represents an opportunity to peacefully resolve the current crisis. we are encouraged by indications that government of ukraine is taking steps to ensure political inclusiveness in the governance of the country. we believe this is a prudent way of addressing one of the underlying causes of the disputes and an early return to peace and stability. the call by the secretary general for cool heads to prevail remains relevant under the circumstance. we urge all concerned to refrain from provocative action that will precipitate now and in the future and unnecessary human suffering. i thank you. >> i thank the representative of nigeria for the statement. i look forward to the representative of the republic of korea. >> thank you, madam
with sand bags, ice bags, all sorts of defenses, and now they are covered in flowers, many, many, many flowers and photographs of those who died. a lot of them by sniper bullets during those disturbances just a week or so ago. kerry was surrounded by an absolute scrum of camera people and security officers and well aware those images would be sent around the world. the substance, of course, of what he said today was that the economic support that the u.s. was prepared to provide for ukraine at a time also when the imf is here, because the economy here is in a terrible state and everyone is aware that the russians can't probably, will tighten the economic screws. we've already seen a hint of that today with the suggestion that gas prices are going to be going up, so a very important gesture by kerry, whose visit here is under very, very close attention, tamron. >> ian williams, thank you very much. now let's get the latest from chuck todd. to pick up on where ian picked off, the economy, economic instability, i'm looking here, the dow is now up 202 points, we're not seeing the rattles,
violence. >> translator: if you are talking about self defense of the cry crimean people, we haven't given them orders. there were special measures taking to the hinderland. as our president said, we will do everything we can to present any blood shed. >> as we mentioned, the world's top diplomats are meeting in paris. it was scheduled to discuss syria but u ukraine discussion is to be high. our diplomatic editor looks at how one crisis is affecting the other. >> the ongoing battles in syria are more than a thousand kilometers away from ukraine. the crisis in crimea may have a real impact. the international community has given this man the job of trying to find peace in syria, but talks convened by veteran peacemaker have achieved nothing. getting both sides back around the table and persuading them, and in particular, the syrian government, to negotiate properly requires pressure from the u.s. and russia working together. that the doesn't look like it will happen. just like the peace talks, the deal to remove syria's chemical weapons was done by us secretary of state, john kerry a
need to keep our defenses up. in an unstable world we do need to keep up our defenses, that is right. that is why this country is investing in some very sophisticated military projects for the future. as twotain the spending percent of our gdp on defense. i do feel that many nato countries have or do stood up theirending -- reduced defense spending. we are one of the few countries that maintains the two percent spending on gdp. eightare countries across -- across nativity to reevaluate the defense spending. >> a partnership between ukraine and nato assigned. declaration did complement the charter that was signed. if you -- if possible nato involvement is ruled out, then are the signatures worth the paper they are written on? -ukraine commission has met on the back of those agreements. there will be further nato agreements -- meetings. we are clear in this house. that we are not planning another crimea war. i am not sure what the member is advocating that nato should do, in addition to the diplomatic moves we have made through nato. those agreements with ukraine are important but they
ground defense that many others have received. what she was separated from her kids, and she was sent to prison. she finally got some good news last fall when an appeals court ordered a new trial. but now a stunning announcement from her prosecutor. state attorney angela corey says she'll try to put marissa alexander in prison for 60 years. 60 years. that's triple alexander's original sentence. it's essentially a life sentence if she is convicted at this upcoming trial. so marissa alexander fires a warning shot. no one is hurt, and she faces 60 years in prison? while others have shot and killed and are walking free today. where is the justice in that? . >> joining me now is lisa bloom, legal analyst for the "today" show and avo.com, and the author of "suspicion nation: the inside story of the trayvon martin injustice and why we continue to repeat it." thank you for being here, lisa. >> thank you, reverend al. >> lisa, how can angela corey try to put marissa alexander behind bars for 60 years when she was originally sentenced to just 20? >> this is another outrage from angela corey's o
. defense secretary chuck hagel today plans to outline how the military will instead use its $500 billion budget to expand cyber warfare capabilities and develop other high-tech weapons. >> but these cuts very, very controversial now in light of what's happening in ukraine. >>> meanwhile, final, new rules aimed at reducing greenhouse gases coming from cars and trucks. the epa is putting the finishing touches on regulations requiring refineries to cut sulfur levels in gasoline by 2017. this also forces lawmakers to change their vehicles to reduce tailpipe emissions. the epa and some environmental groups call it a win for planet earth, but the oil industry says the new rules will drive up costs for everyone. >>> israel's prime minister, benjamin netanyahu, continues his trip to the u.s. today with a speech before the american/israeli public affairs committee, a day after meeting with president obama at the white house, where the two discussed middle east peace efforts and iran's nuclear program. they showed little sign of finding common ground on those issues. netanyahu is likely to bring t
. >> translator: they were local self defense teams. let me make my question more specific. did we participate in training those teams? >> translator: no. we did not. >> at least for today, president obama seemed to get the last word. >> there is a strong belief that russia's action is violating international law. i know president putin seems to have a different set of lawyers making a different set of interpretations, but i don't think that's fooling anybody. >> there is a lot happening now. the breaking news on efforts to build a so-called off ramp for vladimir putin and new details about putin's conversation with president obama. senior white house correspondent jim akosta joins me now with details about that call. jim, what do you know? >> reporter: first thing to point out before i detail that phone call, we're getting word that the president at a local fund-raiser in the washington, d.c. and told people at the fund-raiser that we may be able to deescalate this crisis in his words. the u.s. may be able to deescalate the crisis in the coming days so interesting to hear the president using
the ports. and today, they took over two strategic defense areas, defense missile systems. it appears now they control just about everything. well, overnight, united states time, my crew and i flew down to crimea to get a look on the ground and we'll begin where we landed. we arrived at the airport midday. and everything seemed pretty normal. nobody bothering you, nobody asking questions, nobody staring you down in any strange way. the weather much better here than in the north. and then, over here at this gate that leads out of the airport, a man who professes to be a local from simferopol who is volunteering, with volunteer equipment, things that belong to himself, but one difference you might notice here, see the brand-new scotch tape on the fence post here holding up what is a brand-new russian flag. the changes are subtle. they are not in any way oppressive. but they're here. >> i saw the victims for the first time in my life and i was scared. >> she grew up here. last week when the russians arrived, she was frightened. >> i thought that it was the beginning of maybe war and an expec
peninsula are not actually russians at all but instead members of local self-defense groups. that came as a surprise to many people with eyes and/or ears because they sure look like russian troops firing warning shots at hundreds of ukrainian soldiers attempting to reenter an air base on crimea that the russians have seized. so far this is the only known instance of shots fired between the two groups, but there are forces such as these in the streets of crimea's regional capital patrolling with no identification. today the administration said that the u.s. cannot yet prove that these forces are russian. >> it's pretty clear that they're russian troops. >> i think it's clear, but general dempsey, what evidence do we have. we don't have any evidence as yet. i think evidence could likely become available over time. >> just as an fyi, several of those troops have told reporters that they are russian. meanwhile, nato is cutting back its ties with russia, suspending its first joint mission to escort a u.s. ship as part of efforts to disarm syria. nato says forget about any more meetings with
on the protestor. victoria is a member of the self-defense units. >> i won't forget the faces of the friends facing the police. we had no weapons just stones. i didn't think that the police would kill ewe cranians. viktor yanukovich is gone and we are learning more. >> just before leaving the estate, the aides through the documents into the river. there are people diving into the freezing cold trying to retrieve all of the documents they can. >> about 40,000 documents are moved to a guest house by a group of journalists and sifting through them and making them available online for everyone to see. many more are drying in the sauna. some of the documents reveal a lavish life style and taste for expensive furniture. others detail transactions through a web of shadowed companies and a bank belonging to viktor yanukovich's son. >> we are so excited and then admonished and shocked by the numbers and the names we found in the documents and the company's names in the documents. >> per happens the most shocking is this one, to the extent he was willing to go to crack down on the protestor. deplayin
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